Hare Street Uniting Church

The funeral service for our brother Max will be held on Wednesday August 8, at the church, beginning at 10.30. Max will be buried at Echunga Cemetry. The burial service will begin at approximately 1.00pm.

The people of Jesus time expected that God would send another prophet like Moses. Indeed, Moses himself had once said, " The Lord your God will raise up for you a prophet like me from among your own people; you shall heed such a prophet... I will put my words in the mouth of the prophet, who shall speak to them everything that I command..." (Deuteronomy 18:15, 18)

And the people at the Feeding of 5,000 understood this. It says that "When the people saw the sign that [Jesus] had done, they began to say, ‘This is indeed the prophet who is to come into the world.’" (John 6:14)

And yet the part of that crowd which came across the lake in the boats from Tiberias seem curiously blind. They have seen the feeding, they have eaten, and they want more food. And like Jesus, they know what God has said: "one does not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of the Lord." (Deut 8:3)He's quoting the Old Testament, after all; Deuteronomy Chapter 8. And we expect they knew the tradition, the midrash on scripture, that said  "As was the first redeemer so was the final redeemer; as the first redeemer caused the manna to fall from heaven, even so shall the second redeemer cause the manna to fall." (Ecclesiastes Rabbah 1.9)

So how could they not see that Jesus had done something even greater than Moses!?? In the old stories of Moses, the manna would decay if you took more than you needed. In the sign that Jesus had done, the bread was collected up in baskets so that nothing would be lost. It did not spoil and, what's more, there were twelve baskets, a sign that the broken 12 tribes of Israel— only two were left— would be restored!

How could these people who had been there, who had eaten— how could they not see!? What was making them so blind?... Read on >>>>

There is a long tradition in the synagogue and the church  that when Moses saw the burning bush, there were other people with him who did not see anything! In fact, the bush was always burning; (eg Jeremiah Whitaker C16th) it is a symbol of God who simply Is, without beginning or end. The only question— always— is whether people will see, whether we will perceive that which is before us and around us, or whether we will walk, un-noticing, past the holiness that always burns, and which gives the universe warmth, and light, and being.

God is. God loves. But what we will see will depend upon our perspective.

In the Gospel of Mark, the author has shown us two feasts; two stories of life. Last week the Lectionary directed us to The Feast of Herod the King, a luxury feast in a palace. This week, we have arrived at the other feast, The Feast of Jesus, out in a desert place... Read on >>>>

This is a sermon which deals with violence. It speaks about sexual assault, and all the other violent exclusions we commit against sisters and brothers. I wonder if I have any right to speak about these things, but maybe a male voice is needed; we don't listen to the women.

The text starts with Jesus and a leader of the synagogue… Sometimes it's called the Healing of Jairus' Daughter, but if we look carefully we can see the story uses his name only once… and keeps calling him the leader of the synagogue.  I think it might be called The Enlightening of the Leader of the Synagogue, because it just so happens that the leader of the synagogue is called Jairus: Jairus means enlightened one. Do you see it?—at the end of the story he really is an enlightened one.

Jairus' daughter is an unnamed little girl, but the daughter of a leader of the synagogue is also… the community of faith… This is a story about the death and resurrection of a faith community; it could be our spiritual leader— John— coming to Jesus and saying about us, "My little daughter— my little congregation— is at the point of death."

The story of the little daughter has another story in the middle of it, and that's the story of an unnamed woman who has been ill for 12 years. She has been bleeding life for 12 years. She is slowly dying, too. ... Read on >>>>

There are two ways to look at this story of Jesus calming the storm on the lake. Since the story was first told, there have been people who believe it is literally true: He commanded an actual physical gale to stop and it did.  And since the story was first told, there have been people who understand the story to be about a deeper truth than the mere calming of a physical storm; true in another, perhaps even deeper, way. They see that Jesus will take us safely through all the storms of life when we are about to be drowned. He will empower us to live in the eye of the storm, to live well, despite evil, destruction, and death, raging around us. We will be able to live in a way which is good for us and in a way which God desires— which is the same thing, even though it seems impossible and too hard....Read on >>>>

Imagine being in Paris in May in 1944. Paris, the French capital, is occupied by the German army. Imagine if a man came into Paris in a Jeep, dressed in a British army uniform, and started crying out that the battle would soon be won, that God would soon be in charge, a great victory is at hand.

What do you think the Germans running Paris would have done at that point? ….. …. ….

I think they would have thought the man was crazy! Really!? You're going to overthrow the Third Reich— you!!?

But crazy didn't matter. If someone had started crying out about another kingdom instead of The Thousand Year Reich, the Nazis would have rubbed them out, on the spot. Just like the Romans crushed any talk against the Empire of Caesar. 

Actually, what the Romans would do was kill that sort of person really, really slowly and painfully, to make an example of them, and to act as a deterrent. That's what crucifixion was about. It was a slow inefficient way to kill people… but it made people afraid. In Paris, the Nazis threatened that if you killed a German soldier they would retaliate by killing a hundred civilians; it was the same sort of thing.

But what if that person had come into Paris with a donkey and a little cart, and begun handing out loaves of bread to the hungry citizens, and even to the German soldiers, and had said a great victory had been won. And that the city would soon be returned to what it should be. What kind of victory would that be? And how crazy would that person be?... Read on >>>

This is the first draft. Come along Sunday, because it's bound to be different!

"If there is a God," wrote Simone Weil — a secular Jew who converted to Christianity, "it is not an insignificant fact, but something that requires a radical rethinking of every little thing. Your knowledge of God can't be considered as one fact among many. You have to bring all the other facts into line with the fact of God.” (quoted by Rev James Eaton, who directed me here.) 

In a similar vein, Walter Wink said,

It is the great error of humanity to believe that it is human. We are only fragmentarily human, fleetingly human, brokenly human. We see glimpses of our humanness, we can dream of what a more human existence and political order would be like, but we have not yet arrived at true humanness. Only God is human, and we are made in God’s image and likeness—which is to say, we are capable of becoming human. (Quoted here)...

Given this, perhaps it's not so surprising that Jesus said about following him,

if any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. 35For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake, and for the sake of the gospel, will save it. 

Because if we are "only fragmentarily human, fleetingly human, brokenly human…" if we but "see glimpses of our humanness," then our ideas of what the Messiah will likely be equally broken.... Read on >>>

ow we do our Church Music

We have no hymn books.
Our musicians, a brilliant pianist, and an excellent organist, are both old and in less than stellar health.
How do we sing, as a small congregation, yet also give them a break, and let them stay home at short notice if it is not sensible to push themselves to church?

We have

  1. One License. It it's not covered by One License, and we have no over cover for the song, we don't sing it.
  2. We use the music of Clyde McLennan from smallchurchmusic.com where possible, (free) and as a Uniting Church, we can buy most of the other tunes from MyMidi.com at 25cents per tune. (Thanks Wayne McHugh) It costs you 50cents otherwise.
  3. We use the piano versions of the music. These are excellent, and we have learned to sing to the piano tunes much more easily than to the organ renditions.
  4. We mostly use Together in Song hymns, but add plenty of other stuff if we can purchase music.

How do we make this work?  Read on >>>

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Going Deeper...
Some UCA Resources

One Man's Web
Rev Andrew Prior
Old Testament Lectionary
Rev Dr Anna Grant-Henderson
Lectionary Resources
Rev Dr. Bill Loader
Sarah Tells Stories
Rev Sarah Agnew
The Billabong
Rev Jeff Shrowder
Stepping Stones
Rev John Maynard

 

A place where we try to live the life lessons of
Jesus of Nazareth

with food
Sausages on the barbecue

and new friends
and love
Woman preparing communion
Join us
Church Building
10am Sundays
GPdI Filadelfia meets at 3.00pm
 
 
 

 

ABC Religion News

'Are you a man or a mouse?': NSW Teacher allegedly taunted victims

- - 20-08-2018

A court has been told that an ex-army sergeant and teacher taunted alleged abuse victims, asking if they were 'a man or a mouse?'.

Riot squad to escort council workers to Islamic leader's alleged illegal land clearing site: court

- - 20-08-2018

Council workers visiting a rural property in Sydney's north-west which has allegedly been illegally cleared and developed for a religious group were told police needed the riot squad and a Polair helicopter when accompanying them due to safety concerns, a court hears.

Graham Long hands over reins at Wayside Chapel

- - 20-08-2018 Graham Long has handed over the reins as Pastor at Wayside Chapel to Jon Owen.

Meet the newest 'angel' of Kings Cross

- - 20-08-2018

Welcome to Wayside Chapel, where the "angels of Kings Cross" are transforming lives with the mantra of "love over hate". With a new man in charge, the iconic fixture of Sydney is going from strength to strength.

Mosque open day

- - 18-08-2018

Mosque open day

- - 18-08-2018


 

ABC Religion and Ethics Report

The pastor at the centre of the Turkey row and is Liberalism dead?

- - 15-08-2018 How an evangelical pastor got caught in Turkey's spat with the US. And, in his latest book author Patrick J. Deneen writes that of the three dominant ideologies of the twentieth century—fascism, communism, and liberalism—only the last remains. In an in-depth interview, presenter Andrew West asks the author of the provocative book ‘Why Liberalism Failed’, whether liberalism supplanted religion as the organising principle of the West.  What then were the consequences?

The Pope ignites the death penalty debate

- - 08-08-2018 The Catholic Church has changed its position on capital punishment by declaring it to be "always wrong". The Pew Research Center finds that restrictions on religion have increased around the world. And do we need laws to regulate multiculturalism?

The future of the Catholic Church

- - 01-08-2018 The first Plenary Council - the historic national gathering to consider the future of the Catholic Church in Australia, will be held in Adelaide in October 2020, and the planning has already begun.

Mike Pompeo on religious freedom, Kajsa Ekman on banning surrogate pregnancy, and the Iran factor in India

- - 25-07-2018 In an exclusive interview, the U.S secretary of State, Mike Pompeo discusses the State Department's highest level global meeting on religious freedom. And, forty years ago, the world’s first baby was born through invitro fertilisation. It was ethically controversial then. But today the debate is even more fraught because of surrogacy. Also, Iran's influence on India's Muslim population.

The 50th anniversary of Humanae Vitae

- - 18-07-2018 How Catholic women ignored the church’s ban on artificial contraception, and the Uniting Church approves same gender marriages.

A judge, an archbishop, and a princess

- - 11-07-2018 Judge Brett Kavanaugh is Donald Trump’s nominee to the US Supreme Court and a popular choice among the President’s conservative base. And Peter Comensoli, the new Catholic archbishop elect of Melbourne on why the embattled Archbishop Philip Wilson needs to step down. Also, how Buddhist ritual helped the Thai soccer team survive two weeks trapped in a flooded cave.

Trump's Evangelical mess and the impact of Christianity on the world

- - 04-07-2018 How the politics of division is forcing Christians to check their consciences, and a documentary series asks Christians to recognise the best – and worst – of their faith.