Hare Street Uniting Church

You can walk away... and you may not notice...
In Chapter 8 of Mark, Peter finally gets it: You are the Messiah!

And from then on, Jesus is teaching the disciples what it means to be Messiah, and what it means to follow the Messiah into the kingdom of God.

In the teaching of last week's reading, he took a child in his arms, as a symbol of God's love for all of us. The child epitomises the weak, the powerless, and the defenceless. And what Jesus said to the disciples, who were all about who was the greatest; who was in charge; who understood God— what he said was that, in God's eyes, to be great, to be a leader, to be like God and to welcome God… is to welcome the child and protect the child—and any person who is in the place of the child— above all others.

If the way we are living our lives as Christians is not doing this, then we are not great. We are not living as Christ called us to live. God forgives all things, but that does not change the fact that when we do not welcome the child, and put the child first, we are not living the life of the kingdom. Instead, we... are separating ourselves from God.

Now this week, Jesus really doubles down on this; he emphasises it all over again. It's the same conversation, and the child is still there in his arms, for he talks about "one of these little ones." 

But look how the little ones are caused to stumble by the disciples!  The disciples saw someone healing just like Jesus did, and they told them to stop because they were not "following us." It's as if I said Elliot and the church up the street should stop being church because they don't belong to us! Or one of you saying that Rod's congregation should stop doing what they are doing because they don't belong to the Uniting Church... Read on >>>>

The funeral service for our brother Max will be held on Wednesday August 8, at the church, beginning at 10.30. Max will be buried at Echunga Cemetry. The burial service will begin at approximately 1.00pm.

The people of Jesus time expected that God would send another prophet like Moses. Indeed, Moses himself had once said, " The Lord your God will raise up for you a prophet like me from among your own people; you shall heed such a prophet... I will put my words in the mouth of the prophet, who shall speak to them everything that I command..." (Deuteronomy 18:15, 18)

And the people at the Feeding of 5,000 understood this. It says that "When the people saw the sign that [Jesus] had done, they began to say, ‘This is indeed the prophet who is to come into the world.’" (John 6:14)

And yet the part of that crowd which came across the lake in the boats from Tiberias seem curiously blind. They have seen the feeding, they have eaten, and they want more food. And like Jesus, they know what God has said: "one does not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of the Lord." (Deut 8:3)He's quoting the Old Testament, after all; Deuteronomy Chapter 8. And we expect they knew the tradition, the midrash on scripture, that said  "As was the first redeemer so was the final redeemer; as the first redeemer caused the manna to fall from heaven, even so shall the second redeemer cause the manna to fall." (Ecclesiastes Rabbah 1.9)

So how could they not see that Jesus had done something even greater than Moses!?? In the old stories of Moses, the manna would decay if you took more than you needed. In the sign that Jesus had done, the bread was collected up in baskets so that nothing would be lost. It did not spoil and, what's more, there were twelve baskets, a sign that the broken 12 tribes of Israel— only two were left— would be restored!

How could these people who had been there, who had eaten— how could they not see!? What was making them so blind?... Read on >>>>

There is a long tradition in the synagogue and the church  that when Moses saw the burning bush, there were other people with him who did not see anything! In fact, the bush was always burning; (eg Jeremiah Whitaker C16th) it is a symbol of God who simply Is, without beginning or end. The only question— always— is whether people will see, whether we will perceive that which is before us and around us, or whether we will walk, un-noticing, past the holiness that always burns, and which gives the universe warmth, and light, and being.

God is. God loves. But what we will see will depend upon our perspective.

In the Gospel of Mark, the author has shown us two feasts; two stories of life. Last week the Lectionary directed us to The Feast of Herod the King, a luxury feast in a palace. This week, we have arrived at the other feast, The Feast of Jesus, out in a desert place... Read on >>>>

This is a sermon which deals with violence. It speaks about sexual assault, and all the other violent exclusions we commit against sisters and brothers. I wonder if I have any right to speak about these things, but maybe a male voice is needed; we don't listen to the women.

The text starts with Jesus and a leader of the synagogue… Sometimes it's called the Healing of Jairus' Daughter, but if we look carefully we can see the story uses his name only once… and keeps calling him the leader of the synagogue.  I think it might be called The Enlightening of the Leader of the Synagogue, because it just so happens that the leader of the synagogue is called Jairus: Jairus means enlightened one. Do you see it?—at the end of the story he really is an enlightened one.

Jairus' daughter is an unnamed little girl, but the daughter of a leader of the synagogue is also… the community of faith… This is a story about the death and resurrection of a faith community; it could be our spiritual leader— John— coming to Jesus and saying about us, "My little daughter— my little congregation— is at the point of death."

The story of the little daughter has another story in the middle of it, and that's the story of an unnamed woman who has been ill for 12 years. She has been bleeding life for 12 years. She is slowly dying, too. ... Read on >>>>

There are two ways to look at this story of Jesus calming the storm on the lake. Since the story was first told, there have been people who believe it is literally true: He commanded an actual physical gale to stop and it did.  And since the story was first told, there have been people who understand the story to be about a deeper truth than the mere calming of a physical storm; true in another, perhaps even deeper, way. They see that Jesus will take us safely through all the storms of life when we are about to be drowned. He will empower us to live in the eye of the storm, to live well, despite evil, destruction, and death, raging around us. We will be able to live in a way which is good for us and in a way which God desires— which is the same thing, even though it seems impossible and too hard....Read on >>>>

Imagine being in Paris in May in 1944. Paris, the French capital, is occupied by the German army. Imagine if a man came into Paris in a Jeep, dressed in a British army uniform, and started crying out that the battle would soon be won, that God would soon be in charge, a great victory is at hand.

What do you think the Germans running Paris would have done at that point? ….. …. ….

I think they would have thought the man was crazy! Really!? You're going to overthrow the Third Reich— you!!?

But crazy didn't matter. If someone had started crying out about another kingdom instead of The Thousand Year Reich, the Nazis would have rubbed them out, on the spot. Just like the Romans crushed any talk against the Empire of Caesar. 

Actually, what the Romans would do was kill that sort of person really, really slowly and painfully, to make an example of them, and to act as a deterrent. That's what crucifixion was about. It was a slow inefficient way to kill people… but it made people afraid. In Paris, the Nazis threatened that if you killed a German soldier they would retaliate by killing a hundred civilians; it was the same sort of thing.

But what if that person had come into Paris with a donkey and a little cart, and begun handing out loaves of bread to the hungry citizens, and even to the German soldiers, and had said a great victory had been won. And that the city would soon be returned to what it should be. What kind of victory would that be? And how crazy would that person be?... Read on >>>

This is the first draft. Come along Sunday, because it's bound to be different!

"If there is a God," wrote Simone Weil — a secular Jew who converted to Christianity, "it is not an insignificant fact, but something that requires a radical rethinking of every little thing. Your knowledge of God can't be considered as one fact among many. You have to bring all the other facts into line with the fact of God.” (quoted by Rev James Eaton, who directed me here.) 

In a similar vein, Walter Wink said,

It is the great error of humanity to believe that it is human. We are only fragmentarily human, fleetingly human, brokenly human. We see glimpses of our humanness, we can dream of what a more human existence and political order would be like, but we have not yet arrived at true humanness. Only God is human, and we are made in God’s image and likeness—which is to say, we are capable of becoming human. (Quoted here)...

Given this, perhaps it's not so surprising that Jesus said about following him,

if any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. 35For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake, and for the sake of the gospel, will save it. 

Because if we are "only fragmentarily human, fleetingly human, brokenly human…" if we but "see glimpses of our humanness," then our ideas of what the Messiah will likely be equally broken.... Read on >>>

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Going Deeper...
Some UCA Resources

One Man's Web
Rev Andrew Prior
Old Testament Lectionary
Rev Dr Anna Grant-Henderson
Lectionary Resources
Rev Dr. Bill Loader
Sarah Tells Stories
Rev Sarah Agnew
The Billabong
Rev Jeff Shrowder
Stepping Stones
Rev John Maynard

 

A place where we try to live the life lessons of
Jesus of Nazareth

with food
Sausages on the barbecue

and new friends
and love
Woman preparing communion
Join us
Church Building
10am Sundays
GPdI Filadelfia meets at 3.00pm
 
 
 

 

ABC Religion News

Buddhist extremism: Meet the violent followers of a religion widely known for its pacifism

- - 21-10-2018

While in many people's eyes terrorism has come to be intertwined with Islam, militant monks and hard-line army generals in Myanmar and beyond are recasting perceptions of Buddhism.

Alt-Nietzsche: Why the German philosopher is the wrong poster boy for neo-Nazism

- - 21-10-2018

Nearly 80 years after the collapse of Nazi Germany, the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche is again being embraced by elements of the extreme right, this time in the USA. But like the Nazis, they're doing it wrong.

'It's a life sentence': How sexual abuse caused Katie nine decades of pain

- - 21-10-2018

The day Katie's parents abandoned her aged six, her life changed forever. Nine decades later, she shares her story ahead of tomorrow's national apology to survivors of childhood sexual abuse.

Fashion festival showcase aims to redesign perception of Islamic fashion

- - 20-10-2018

Students from Indonesia and Australia collaborate on a unique collection of modest garments they hope will change the industry's perception of Islamic fashion.

What's in an apology? Scott Morrison to join list of PMs that have given a public 'sorry'

- - 20-10-2018

The Prime Minister will join a growing list of statesmen who have made the same public gesture when he delivers an apology to victims of institutional child sexual abuse but welfare groups have warned against leaving it to institutions themselves to manage the reparation process.

Domestic abuse survivors within Anglican Church to receive financial assistance

- - 19-10-2018

In what is being billed as a potential "world first", victims of domestic abuse in the Sydney Anglican Church will be able to apply for substantial financial assistance.

Protests erupt over decision to allow women into ancient Hindu temple

- - 18-10-2018 Hundreds of protestors gathered outside Kerala's Sabarimala after a court ruling that overturned a ban on women entering.


 

ABC Religion and Ethics Report

The Saudi challenge, measuring prosperity with a former Archbishop, and dealing with gay rights in religious schools

- - 17-10-2018 Inside Saudi Arabia - can a regime that still practices beheadings call itself reformist? And, is there a balance between the rights of faith-based schools and the gay students and teachers who work in them? Also, the former Archbishop of Canterbury says we need a new way to measure prosperity and well-being.

Blasphemy, tolerance, and the revolutionary saint Romero

- - 10-10-2018 Ireland's referendum on blasphemy laws could trigger reform of blasphemy laws around the world. And, religious tolerance in Trump's America - some surprising findings. Also, spurned by two popes, Archbishop Oscar Romero, human rights hero of El Salvador, is to be made a saint next week by Pope Francis.

The German church scandal and removing the "seal of confession"

- - 03-10-2018 German investigators have been left shaken by the scale of child abuse uncovered in a major internal report released recently, and Father Frank Brennan on Tasmanian jail terms for priests and other professional who fail to report child abuse.

A historic deal and God is from Brazil

- - 26-09-2018 In a landmark deal the Vatican signed an agreement giving it a say in the appointment of bishops in China.  And Catholic majority Brazil has a polarizing and populist election campaign under way where minority Pentecostals may determine the outcome.

The true conservative tradition

- - 19-09-2018 If the polls are right, Labor’s poised for victory at the next federal election. But is there a philosophy to help guide it through government? And on what principles will a divided Liberal Party rebuild itself? Also, the stigma of seeking help for mental illness in Australia’s religiously devout African communities.

Wrestling with transhumanism and the Vatican conspiracy

- - 12-09-2018 The next step in the evolution of humans, and how sexual abuse allegations are being weaponised in the Vatican.

Why the celibate system should be changed

- - 05-09-2018 Australia’s Catholic Church has signed up to almost every recommendation of the royal commission into child sexual abuse. Does its decision to hold out on two issues suggest the church is still in denial? And our focus on China wraps up with a look at the country’s religious minorities.